March 7, 2021

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Week 15 Quick Reads | Football Outsiders

19 min read
Week 15 Quick Reads | Football Outsiders


As we have written about earlier this year, one of the biggest stories of this NFL season has been the extreme difference between the best and worst defenses this season, and the radical effects that difference has had on our opponent adjustments. Just this week, for example, Matt Ryan gained a league-high 87 DYAR due to opponent adjustments for playing the mighty San Francisco defense. Eli Manning, on the other land, lost 65 DYAR for playing the woeful Miami Dolphins. That’s a swing of 152 DYAR between the two quarterbacks based purely on who they were playing, without even analyzing the result of a single pass. Considering the gap between the quarterbacks at the top (Lamar Jackson, before Monday night) and bottom (Devlin Hodges) of our tables this week is 321 DYAR, we can see that opponent adjustments can account for nearly half of the variance between the best and worst quarterbacks in a given week.

That’s just one week though. What happens if we look at the season as a whole? Do those differences tend to even out over the course of the year, or have some players feasted on a series of cupcakes while others have run a gauntlet of brutal opponents?

We can answer this by looking at the difference between each quarterback’s passing DYAR (Defense-adjusted Yards Above Replacement) and passing YAR (Yards Above Replacement, the same statistic without accounting for opponents). (More information on these statistics is available here.) Using this methodology, here are the quarterbacks who have played the most difficult schedules this season:

Andy Dalton, CIN
Passing DYAR: 7
Passing YAR: -214
Difference: +221

Dalton has only played one truly bad pass defense this season: the Cardinals (29th in pass defense DVOA coming into the week) in Week 5. And though the Bengals lost, Dalton had a good game, completing 71% of his passes for 6.9 yards per throw with two touchdowns, no interceptions, and only one sack. Meanwhile, he has played against each of the top five teams in pass defense DVOA: the Patriots, 49ers, Steelers, Ravens, and Bills. In those five contests, he completed 57% of his passes and a 6.0-yard average with four touchdowns, nine interceptions, and 16 sacks. Dalton has missed three games this year, and one of those was against the Oakland Raiders, next-to-last in pass defense DVOA. The other two, however, were rematches against the Steelers and Ravens. The good news for Dalton is that his life is about to get a lot easier — the Bengals play the Dolphins (last in pass defense DVOA, by a lot) this week before closing the year against the Browns (13th).

Russell Wilson, SEA
Passing DYAR: 1,211
Passing YAR: 1,062
Difference: +149

Wilson has played three of the teams in the bottom seven in pass defense DVOA — the Falcons, Bengals, and Cardinals — and in three wins he completed 74% of his passes with a 9.1-yard average with five touchdowns and no interceptions (he did take 10 sacks, because he is still Russell Wilson). Eight times, though, he has played opponents in the top 11: the 49ers, Ravens, and Steelers, plus the Saints, Vikings, Panthers, and Rams (twice). Wilson only went 5-3 in those games, completing 66% of his throws for 7.7 yards per pass with 13 touchdowns, four interceptions, and 18 sacks … which, you know, are pretty good numbers, because he is still Russell Wilson. Wilson’s last two games will come against one very bad pass defense (Arizona) and one very good one (San Francisco); depending on how many passes he throws in those games, he may pass Dalton for the most difficult schedule of the year.

Ben Roethlisberger, PIT
Passing DYAR: 101
Passing YAR: -31
Difference: +132

And now a case of adding insult to injury. Roethlisberger threw 47 passes (plus one sack) against New England, one of the best pass defenses we have seen this century. He came back the next week and threw 15 passes (plus one more sack) against Seattle (15th in pass defense DVOA) before his season ended with an elbow injury. And that’s it.

Ryan Fitzpatrick, MIA
Passing DYAR: 179
Passing YAR: 56
Difference: +123

Poor, poor Ryan Fitzpatrick. He plays in the AFC East, which means games against the Patriots and Bills … but he also plays for the Dolphins, which means he doesn’t get to play against his own team’s defense, the worst in the league. Between Buffalo (twice), New England, Pittsburgh, and Baltimore, Fitzpatrick completed 62% of his passes for a 6.5-yard average with four touchdowns, seven interceptions, and 17 sacks. Take away his games the last two weeks against the Jets and Giants — the only teams he has faced that rank in the bottom 10 in pass defense DVOA — and he would be just behind Dalton for second place on this list. In three games against the two New Jersey clubs (the past two weeks and the first Jets game in November), Fitzpatrick completed 60% of his passes for a 7.1-yard average with five touchdowns, one interception, and nine sacks. He’ll close out the year with games against the Bengals, who are very bad, and the Patriots, who are not.

Baker Mayfield, CLE
Passing DYAR: 43
Passing YAR: -78
Difference: +121

As if not enough things had gone wrong for Cleveland this year, they have also had to play a very tough schedule: two games against the Steelers, plus the Ravens, Patriots, 49ers, and Bills. Mayfield completed 59% of his passes in those games for a 6.8-yard average with seven touchdowns, five interceptions, and 18 sacks. He also won three of them — Mayfield’s Browns are the last team to beat the Ravens. He has played three games against notably bad defenses — the Bengals, Cardinals, and Dolphins — completing 64% of his throws with a 7.6-yard average, five touchdowns, four interceptions, and only three sacks. Yet the Browns only won one of those games. What a weird year this has been. Mayfield will close the year with rematches against the Ravens and Bengals.


You’ll note that this discussion has involved a lot of quarterbacks who have played against defenses in the AFC East. It’s surprising, then, that the quarterback who has been hurt most by opponent adjustments play in that same division.

Sam Darnold, NYJ
Passing DYAR: -262
Passing YAR: -67
Difference: -195

Keep in mind that Darnold missed the Jets’ first game against New England. He did play against the Patriots in Week 7, and has also played one game each against the Bills and Ravens, completing 54% of his passes for a 4.6-yard average with three touchdowns, five interceptions, and six sacks. Those three games are the only games this year in which Darnold has gotten a boost from opponent adjustments. Otherwise he has played against a who’s who of who sucks — the Raiders, Giants, Bengals, and of course two games against the Dolphins. Including those five contests, Darnold had a six-week stretch where the best opponent he faced was Washington, who came into the week 18th in pass defense DVOA. In those six games, Darnold completed 63% of his passes with a 7.6-yard average, 10 touchdowns, three interceptions, and 13 sacks. Darnold’s year is ending with the toughest part of his schedule — fresh off Thursday night’s loss to Baltimore, the Jets finish up with the Steelers and Bills.

Jacoby Brissett, IND
Passing DYAR: 450
Passing YAR: 591
Difference: -141

Note that this does not include Brissett’s Monday night outing against the Saints, who will be just the second top-10 pass defense Brissett has played this year. Up to this point, the most difficult defense Brissett has faced has been the Chiefs, who rank sixth. He only averaged 5.2 yards per pass with no touchdowns against Kansas City, but he did complete 62% of his passes and threw only one interception with no sacks a 19-13 win. Brissett’s easiest opponents have been the Falcons, Raiders, and Texans twice; in those four games, he completed 64% of his passes for 7.0 yards apiece with nine touchdowns, one interception, and three sacks. Brissett will close the year against Carolina (eighth in pass defense DVOA) and Jacksonville (21st) and could pass Darnold when all is said and done.

Josh Allen, BUF
Passing DYAR: -59
Passing YAR: 55
Difference: -114

Hey, look! It’s another AFC East quarterback who has only played the Patriots once so far! In addition to New England, Allen has played two other quality defenses in the Ravens and Steelers, and he was helpless in those three games, completing 47% of his passes for 4.8 yards per throw with two touchdowns, four interceptions, and 11 sacks. Meanwhile, Allen has gotten to play the Giants, Bengals, and — naturally — the Dolphins (twice), and in those four games he has completed 63% of his passes for 7.6 yards per throw with seven touchdowns, one interception, and a half-dozen sacks. The Bills play in New England on Saturday in Allen’s last chance before the playoffs to show he can hold his own against a postseason-caliber defense, then finish up against the Jets in Week 17 (assuming Allen even plays that game).

Mitchell Trubisky, CHI
Passing DYAR: 17
Passing YAR: 121
Difference: -104

Trubisky’s first and last games this season have come against the Packers, and he also played the Saints in Week 7. Those are his only games this year with double-digit boosts from opponent adjustments. He completed 59% of his passes for a 5.3-yard average with three touchdowns, three interceptions, and 10 sacks in those games. Most of his opponents have been in the middle of the pack, though he did get two games against the Lions and one against the Giants (all in November!). He completed 69% of his passes for a 7.7-yard average with seven touchdowns, three interceptions, and eight sacks in those games. He’ll finish up against the Chiefs and Vikings, two of the better defenses he has played all year, who will both need wins to maintain ground in the playoff race.

Kirk Cousins, MIN
Passing DYAR: 901
Passing YAR: 1,003
Difference: -102

Yes, it has been a good year to be an NFC North quarterback. (Matthew Stafford nearly made this list with a -91 difference between DYAR and YAR, in only eight starts. Aaron Rodgers is currently at +40; the Packers play Minnesota this week and Detroit in Week 17.) The toughest defense Cousins has faced has been the Chiefs; otherwise, he biggest opponent adjustment boosts have come from two games against Chicago and Green Bay. In those three contests, Cousins completed 57% of his passes for a 6.4-yard average with four touchdowns, two interceptions, and eight sacks. Meanwhile, he has faced the Lions twice, plus the Giants, Raiders, and Falcons; in those five games he completed 76% of his throws for a 9.5-yard average with nine touchdowns, zero interceptions, and five sacks. Cousins closes the year against the Packers and Bears in games that will have a crucial impact on the NFC playoff race.


The funny thing about all of this is, despite the extreme variance in defensive strength this year, none of these men are close to breaking any all-time records. The most difficult schedule for any quarterback on record was Tom Brady’s in 2009, when the Revis Island Jets and Jairus Byrd’s Bills finished first and second in pass defense DVOA. The easiest schedule was faced by Kurt Warner in 1999, when they shared a division with four horrible teams — the Panthers, Saints, Falcons, and 49ers each finished in the bottom 11 in pass defense DVOA.

Matt Ryan has also played some notable schedules in his career. His 2013 season was the second-most difficult schedule of any quarterback on record; the Falcons played seven games against the top six pass defenses that year, include the Legion of Boom Seahawks at their best. Just two years later, Ryan played the second-easiest schedule we have ever measured, including the Saints team that had been the worst defense on record until they were “passed” by our analysis of the 1986 Buccaneers.

Quarterbacks

Rk

Player

Team

CP/AT

Yds

TD

INT

Sacks

Total
DYAR

Pass
DYAR

Rush
DYAR

Opp

1.

Drew Brees NO

29/30

307

4

0

0

241

241

0

IND

2.

Lamar Jackson BAL

15/23

212

5

0

1

227

182

45

NYJ

Jackson’s average pass traveled 12.8 yards beyond the line of scrimmage, most of any starter this week. Three of Jackson’s touchdown passes came on second down, where he went 7-of-9 for 93 yards with a sack. Only one of his touchdowns came on throws down the middle, but that is where he did most of his work, going 9-of-12 for 122 yards, plus a 43-yard DPI.

3.

Matt Ryan ATL

25/39

210

2

0

2

181

172

9

SF

Ryan, as noted in the main essay, gained a league-high 87 DYAR due to opponent adjustments this week. He had a cold spell in the middle of this game — from his 5-yard touchdown pass to Julio Jones in the first quarter to the point when the 49ers took a 19-10 lead in the fourth, he went 6-of-12 for 41 yards with as many first downs (two) as sacks. But then he played some very effective small-ball leading Atlanta’s comeback, finishing up 11-of-16 for 95 yards and a touchdown, plus a 32-yard DPI, on the last two drives.

4.

Russell Wilson SEA

20/26

286

2

0

2

154

160

-6

CAR

Wilson came out of the gates on fire, starting out 8-of-10 for 175 yards and two scores as Seattle took a 20-7 lead in the second quarter. On deep passes that traveled more than 15 yards downfield, he went 5-of-7 for 157 yards and two touchdowns.

5.

Jameis Winston TB

28/42

458

4

1

2

154

153

1

DET

Winston loses 60 DYAR due to opponent adjustments. His performance on Tampa Bay’s first five drives was kind of insane, as he went 15-of-19 for 291 yards with three touchdowns, one sack, and one interception in less than one half. Throughout the game, he bombed the Lions’ secondary relentlessly. He threw a dozen deep balls in this game, completing seven of them for 222 yards and three touchdowns.

6.

Patrick Mahomes KC

27/34

340

2

1

3

146

142

4

DEN

Two years ago I got kind of obsessed with the idea of whether some quarterbacks played streakier than others. (Here is one piece in that series.) Mahomes’ game against Denver would have been a fine case study in that piece, because it was streaky as hell. He picked up first downs on seven of his first nine dropbacks, then went four straight dropbacks without one. Then he picked up four first downs in five dropbacks, then went seven straight dropbacks without one. Then he picked up first downs on five straight dropbacks, but only picked up two more in his final eight plays. In those hot streaks, he combined to go 16-of-18 for 229 yards with two touchdowns, plus a 22-yard DPI. In the cold streaks, he went 11-of-16 for 111 yards with three sacks and an interception.

7.

Dwayne Haskins WAS

19/28

261

2

0

0

113

111

3

PHI

Haskins was dynamite on his own half of the field, but not much good once crossing the 50. In Philadelphia territory, he went 4-of-8 for 28 yards with just one first down, a 5-yard touchdown to Steven Sims.

8.

Kyler Murray ARI

19/25

219

1

1

0

86

79

6

CLE

Murray had more dropbacks in Cleveland territory (15) than in his own half of the field (11). Once crossing the 50, he went 11-of-14 for 106 yards and a touchdown, plus a 21-yard DPI.

9.

Derek Carr OAK

22/36

267

1

0

4

76

71

5

JAX

Carr struggled to finish drives. Inside the Jaguars’ 40-yard line, he went 1-of-8 for 17 yards, one sack, and no touchdowns. You’ll recall that the Raiders lost this game by four points.

10.

Dak Prescott DAL

15/23

212

2

0

0

75

96

-21

LAR

Talk about a Jekyll-&-Hyde game. Prescott picked up just one first down in his first ten dropbacks, going 4-of-10 for 36 yards. Then his last pass of the first quarter was a 19-yard touchdown, and then in the last three quarters he went 10-of-12 for 157 yards and a score. He did not have a dropback in the fourth quarter; his 84 DYAR in the second and third quarters ranked third this week. His average completion gained 9.9 yards after the catch, most of any starter this week.

11.

Carson Wentz PHI

30/43

266

3

0

2

48

57

-9

WAS

Wentz’s DYAR take a hit because he fumbled on two of his sacks, losing one. With the Eagles’ wide receiver corps in disarray, Wentz leaned heavily on his running backs, completing each of his 13 passes to Miles Sanders and Boston Scott for 89 yards and a touchdown.

12.

Josh Allen BUF

13/25

139

1

1

1

41

21

19

PIT

Allen gained 42 DYAR due to opponent adjustments. He threw seven passes down the middle against Pittsburgh, completing two of them — one to his own team (an 8-yard gain on first-and-10) and one to the Steelers. His average completion gained only 1.2 yards after the catch, least of any starter this week.

Rk

Player

Team

CP/AT

Yds

TD

INT

Sacks

Total
DYAR

Pass
DYAR

Rush
DYAR

Opp

13.

Ryan Tannehill TEN

22/35

279

2

1

2

37

25

12

HOU

It was too little, too late, but Tannehill was at his best in the fourth quarter, going 9-of-12 for 99 yards and two touchdowns, with two sacks.

14.

Jacoby Brissett IND

18/34

165

0

0

1

27

22

4

NO

15.

Kirk Cousins MIN

19/25

207

1

1

0

20

15

5

LAC

Cousins had a pair of aborted snaps in the first half (both on first down at that), but the Vikings were fortunate to recover both. He had a perfect day throwing down the middle, completing each of his eight passes in that direction for 80 yards and a touchdown.

16.

Jimmy Garoppolo SF

22/34

200

1

0

1

20

17

3

ATL

Garoppolo threw 10 passes to receivers behind the line of scrimmage, tied with Carson Wentz for most in the league this week. He completed nine of them for 74 yards. On a related note, his average pass traveled just 4.0 yards beyond the line of scrimmage, least of any starter this week.

17.

Gardner Minshew JAX

17/29

201

2

0

2

12

11

1

OAK

Minshew loses 49 DYAR due to opponent adjustments. His first pass of the game was a 55-yard completion to Keelan Cole, but then he picked up just one first down in his next 12 dropbacks, going 3-of-11 for 15 yards with one sack. As you’d expect, he was at his best leading the Jaguars’ comeback. After the Raiders went up 16-3, Minshew went 10-of-13 for 88 yards and two touchdowns, plus a 21-yard DPI.

18.

Aaron Rodgers GB

17/33

203

1

0

1

9

4

4

CHI

Rodgers struggled in scoring range. Inside the Bears 40, he went 5-of-8 for 43 yards with only one first down (a 29-yard touchdown to Davante Adams) with one intentional grounding and one sack.

19.

Sam Darnold NYJ

18/32

218

2

1

1

9

3

5

BAL

Almost all of Darnold’s good plays came on throws to his wide receivers. He completed four of his five throws to running backs and tight ends, but for a total of just 10 yards, and the one that was not completed was intercepted.

20.

Philip Rivers LAC

29/39

307

1

3

3

8

8

0

MIN

The Chargers fumbled on three of Rivers’ completions, losing two of them. Only 14 other quarterbacks have had so many fumbles on completed passes all season. Kirk Cousins, Russell Wilson, and Carson Wentz lead the way with six apiece.

21.

Mitchell Trubisky CHI

29/52

334

1

2

3

1

-1

1

GB

One of Trubisky’s interceptions came on a Hail Mary at the end of the first half. He didn’t get much help from his backs or tight ends — on throws to those positions, he went 10-of-15 for 75 yards with as many first downs (one) as interceptions.

22.

Deshaun Watson HOU

19/27

243

2

2

1

-3

10

-13

TEN

Watson packed a full season’s worth of opposition-territory excitement into this game. On Tennessee’s side of the 50, he went 8-of-14 for 109 yards and two touchdowns, but he also threw a pair of red zone interceptions. He’s the first player to throw two red zone picks in a game since Sam Darnold in Week 7 against the Patriots.

Rk

Player

Team

CP/AT

Yds

TD

INT

Sacks

Total
DYAR

Pass
DYAR

Rush
DYAR

Opp

23.

Ryan Fitzpatrick MIA

23/41

279

2

0

3

-4

1

-5

NYG

Fitzpatrick loses 51 DYAR due to opponent adjustments. His 20-yard touchdown to DeVante Parker put the Dolphins up 7-0. Over Miami’s next eight drives, he went 7-of-20 (throwing six incompletions in a row at one point) for 67 yards with three sacks and a 7-yard DPI as the Giants built a 36-13 lead.

24.

Andy Dalton CIN

17/31

151

1

4

0

-28

-26

-2

NE

Dalton gained 82 DYAR due to opponent adjustments. In the first half Dalton played well and the Patriots only led 13-10, but in the second half the wheels fell off. After halftime, he went 10-of-23 for 96 yards with four interceptions, including a pick-six.

25.

Eli Manning NYG

20/28

283

2

3

1

-29

-29

0

MIA

Manning loses 65 DYAR due to opponent adjustments. His deepest pass of the game was intercepted 31 yards downfield; he also threw an interception that traveled 9 yards downfield. On throws between those two distances, he went 8-of-11 for 210 yards and a touchdown, plus a 24-yard DPI.

26.

Baker Mayfield CLE

30/42

247

2

1

1

-31

-38

7

ARI

Mayfield loses 64 DYAR due to opponent adjustments. He was fairly efficient in this game, passing for 16 first downs, but couldn’t get big plays, with a long completion of only 26 yards (and even on that one, Ricky Seals-Jones fumbled the ball away, though that has no effect on Mayfield’s numbers). Those 16 first downs averaged only 10.1 yards apiece, least of any starter this week.

27.

Jared Goff LAR

33/51

284

2

1

2

-32

-26

-7

DAL

Goff loses 42 DYAR due to opponent adjustments. He had a rough day on third and fourth downs, going 4-of-10 for 21 yards (yes) with one touchdown, two other conversions, and two sacks.

28.

Drew Lock DEN

18/40

208

0

1

2

-45

-29

-15

KC

Lock gained 53 DYAR due to opponent adjustments. In Kansas City territory, he went 5-of-19 for 24 yards with no touchdowns, one sack, and one interception. He threw nine passes that traveled more than 10 yards downfield and completed two of them — one to Noah Fant for a 43-yard gain, one to Juan Thornhill for a Chiefs interception.

29.

Tom Brady NE

15/29

128

2

0

2

-67

-67

0

CIN

Brady loses 44 DYAR due to opponent adjustments. He had a terrible day on throws to his right, going 6-of-10 for all of 20 yards. None of those completions gained more than 8 yards, and only one picked up a first down. He threw four deep passes against the Bengals; none were complete.

30.

Kyle Allen CAR

25/40

277

1

3

1

-67

-76

9

SEA

Allen had by far the worst DYAR in the league in the first three quarters this week (largely because his last two passes in the third quarter were both intercepted), but was second-best behind Matt Ryan in the fourth quarter. In the final 15 minutes, he went 10-of-15 for 136 yards and a touchdown, picking up first downs on six straight throws at one point. And considering that score left the Panthers down 30-24 with more than three minutes left in the game, you can’t just write that off as garbage-time production either.

31.

David Blough DET

24/43

260

0

2

2

-78

-91

12

TB

Blough did not attempt a deep pass until he had a third-and-12 while down 21-3 in the third quarter; his bomb on that play was intercepted, and soon the Bucs were up 24-3. Most of Blough’s production came after that — up to that point he had gone 10-of-20 for 72 yards with one interception, one sack, and zero third-down conversions.

32.

Devlin Hodges PIT

23/38

202

1

4

4

-94

-95

2

BUF

Hodges gained 42 DYAR due to opponent adjustments. Hodges is the first quarterback with four interceptions, four sacks, and one fumble in a game since … his teammate Mason Rudolph, who did it three weeks ago. The Steelers are the first team since at least 1993 with two such games in the same season. Three of Hodges’ interceptions were thrown on deep balls, two of those to James Washington. Take away everyone’s sacks and interceptions and Hodges would have ranked 21st this week instead of last. (Taking his spot in last place would have been Tom Brady.)

 

Five Best Running Backs by DYAR (Total)

Rk

Player

Team

Runs

Rush
Yds

Rush
TD

Rec

Rec
Yds

Rec
TD

Total
DYAR

Rush
DYAR

Rec
DYAR

Opp

1.

Ezekiel Elliott DAL

24

117

2

3/4

43

0

88

69

19

LAR

Elliott gains 16 DYAR due to opponent adjustments. Though his longest run gained only 15 yards, 10 of his carries resulted in first downs, and every one of them — many of them while up by multiple touchdowns in the second half — gained at least 1 yard. Two of his catches also picked up first downs.

2.

Kenyan Drake ARI

22

137

4

1/1

9

0

71

66

5

CLE

Drake loses 14 DYAR due to opponent adjustments. Three of Drake’s touchdown runs came from within the 5-yard line, but he also showed plenty of pop, with a half-dozen runs that gained 10 yards or more. Eleven of his runs resulted in first downs, while only three were stuffed.

3.

Mark Ingram BAL

13

76

1

1/2

10

1

58

49

9

NYJ

Ingram gains 17 DYAR due to opponent adjustments. Eight of his runs gained 5 yards or more, the longest a 29-yarder, and four resulted in first downs. Only two were stuffed.

4.

Tony Pollard DAL

12

131

1

2/2

12

0

57

58

-1

LAR

Pollard only ran for four first downs, but three of those carries gained 25 yards or more. He is the only player with three 25-yard runs in a game this season. Meanwhile, he was also stuffed three times.

5.

Christian McCaffrey CAR

19

87

2

8/10

88

0

55

27

28

SEA

The Seahawks stuffed McCaffrey four times, but he still ran for six first downs, including four runs of 11 yards or more. Four of his catches also produced first downs, each of those plays gained at least 14 yards.

 

Five Best Running Backs by DYAR (Rushing)

Rk

Player

Team

Runs

Rush
Yds

Rush
TD

Rec

Rec
Yds

Rec
TD

Total
DYAR

Rush
DYAR

Rec
DYAR

Opp

1.

Ezekiel Elliott DAL

24

117

2

3/4

43

0

88

69

19

LAR

2.

Kenyan Drake ARI

22

137

4

1/1

9

0

71

66

5

CLE

3.

Tony Pollard DAL

12

131

1

2/2

12

0

57

58

-1

LAR

4.

Carlos Hyde HOU

26

104

1

0/0

0

0

49

49

0

TEN

Hyde gains 19 rushing DYAR due to opponent adjustments. His longest run gained only 11 yards, but six of his carries went for first downs, and 16 gained 3 yards or more, while only three were stuffed.

5.

Mark Ingram BAL

13

76

1

1/2

10

1

58

49

9

NYJ

 

Worst Running Back by DYAR (Total)

Rk

Player

Team

Runs

Rush
Yds

Rush
TD

Rec

Rec
Yds

Rec
TD

Total
DYAR

Rush
DYAR

Rec
DYAR

Opp

1.

Matt Breida SF

4

11

0

2/2

6

0

-36

-33

-3

ATL

Breida’s yardage totals are dreary enough, but he also fumbled on two of his four carries.

 

Worst Running Back by DYAR (Rushing)

Rk

Player

Team

Runs

Rush
Yds

Rush
TD

Rec

Rec
Yds

Rec
TD

Total
DYAR

Rush
DYAR

Rec
DYAR

Opp

1.

Matt Breida SF

4

11

0

2/2

6

0

-36

-33

-3

ATL

 

Five Best Wide Receivers and Tight Ends by DYAR

Rk

Player

Team

Rec

Att

Yds

Avg

TD

Total
DYAR

Opp

1.

Breshad Perriman TB

5

6

113

22.6

3

76

DET

Perriman’s totals include 75 receiving DYAR, 1 rushing DYAR for his one carry for 3 yards. Each of his catches produced a first down, including three third-down conversions, and four of them gained 25 yards or more.

2.

Julio Jones ATL

13

20

134

10.3

2

73

SF

Jones gains 22 DYAR due to opponent adjustments. Ten of his catches produced first downs, and he gained an 11th on a 32-yard DPI.

3.

Terry McLaurin WAS

5

5

130

26.0

1

61

PHI

Three of McLaurin’s catches produced first downs, including a 75-yard touchdown. He gained a fourth first down on a 14-yard DPI.

4.

Jonnu Smith TEN

5

5

60

12.0

0

51

HOU

Smith’s totals include 28 receiving DYAR, 23 rushing DYAR for his one carry for 57 yards. Three of his catches went for first downs, the longest a 23-yarder.

5.

Tyler Lockett SEA

8

9

120

15.0

1

50

CAR

Five of Lockett’s catches produced first downs, including gains of 20 and 44 yards.

 

Worst Wide Receiver or Tight End by DYAR

Rk

Player

Team

Rec

Att

Yds

Avg

TD

Total
DYAR

Opp

1.

Mohamed Sanu NE

2

8

13

6.5

0

-50

CIN

Sanu’s two cathes were a 7-yard gain on second-and-10 and a 6-yard gain on third-and-10. He was the target on incomplete passes on third-and-4 and fourth-and-4.


http://www.footballoutsiders.com/quick-reads/2019/week-15-quick-reads

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